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March 13, 2013 6:41 pm  #31


Re: Crying on cue: stories behind the scene

Yellowrose, have you seen that episode? can you tell me in which season finale it is?


“To weep is to make less the depth of grief.”
― William Shakespeare
 

March 13, 2013 7:30 pm  #32


Re: Crying on cue: stories behind the scene

Actor John Barrymore was supposedly well known for his ability to cry on cue.  When Garson Kanin directed him in "The Great Man Votes", he was amazed at Barrymore's ability to control his tears.  At one point Barrymore told him "I'll cry two big tears out of my left eye, and follow with three smaller tears from my right."  And then he proceeded to do just that.  When Kanin remarked on how impressed he was, Barrymore replied "It's crying, not acting.  Doesn't mean a damn thing."


"We have our stalking memories, and they will demand their rightful tears."
Anonymous
 

March 13, 2013 10:00 pm  #33


Re: Crying on cue: stories behind the scene

that's the funniest statement i heard on crying )))


“To weep is to make less the depth of grief.”
― William Shakespeare
 

March 14, 2013 5:49 pm  #34


Re: Crying on cue: stories behind the scene


“To weep is to make less the depth of grief.”
― William Shakespeare
 

March 15, 2013 3:23 am  #35


Re: Crying on cue: stories behind the scene

psychic_girl- I have seen the White Collar Episode.  I was not impressed.  I'm pretty sure he cried after the camera stopped rolling or they didn't use the takes.  It's either the 1st or 2nd season finale  Check it out if you want, but it was kinda disappointing.


"...men do not cry. They will do anything BUT cry. They stop themselves crying. And eventually they do cry if it is bad enough. So that's how you know with a man how bad it is for him. Because he would've stopped himself...Men always cry like that. They don't cry and in the end they do and if they do then it's overwhelming." ~Michael Caine
 

March 15, 2013 11:42 am  #36


Re: Crying on cue: stories behind the scene

Hi Yellowrose, i see what it is, a commercial type of crying..i've seen some clips on youtube made by a fan with that take and yeah it's not tremendous


“To weep is to make less the depth of grief.”
― William Shakespeare
 

March 22, 2013 11:04 pm  #37


Re: Crying on cue: stories behind the scene

Evan Peters talks about his character from American Horror Story and how he made him cry like that :
 
http://www.examiner.com/article/interview-american-horror-story-evan-peters-on-tate-season-finale


“To weep is to make less the depth of grief.”
― William Shakespeare
 

April 27, 2013 1:30 am  #38


Re: Crying on cue: stories behind the scene

Sutherland tells about crying at the end of 24 and during sme speech, pretty descriptive  :
 
http://www.whatsontv.co.uk/24/news/kiefer-sutherland-i-love-coronation-street


“To weep is to make less the depth of grief.”
― William Shakespeare
 

May 9, 2013 4:12 pm  #39


Re: Crying on cue: stories behind the scene

There is an interesting article about vincent cassel, where he sobs during an interview, very intense writing. i am gonna copy it,but only parts of it, since you have to pay for the article. so i don't know about the copy rights.....
i am gonna post the end of the article later on...


Stefanie Marsh
Published at 5:57PM, April 21 2012Women want to be with him, men want to be him – so why is Vincent Cassel crying? By Stefanie Marsh

What one would perhaps normally do if, provoked by a terrible childhood memory, the person in front of you begins suddenly to weep, is to extend a comforting arm. But this is an interview and the correct etiquette, as far as my own behaviour is concerned, is unclear. Outside the door, film industry personnel are lurking. I am worried that, should they enter at this delicate juncture, they will assume that I have been the cause of the tears that Vincent Cassel is now shedding so copiously into a cloth napkin.

We are supposed to be talking about cinema. But the conversation has strayed, perhaps catastrophically, in the direction of his childhood, and I had hoped, when I first caught sight of them, that I’d hallucinated the suddenly water-logged eyes. I’d hoped, further, that the first tear, when it came, had been allowed to meander down those bony features for effect (minutes earlier, he had told me that the image he projects of himself to the public is a “scam”). But now the eyes are shot with red. The cheeks are wet. The breath is a battery of stuttered gasps and wheezes. My immediate reaction is to panic. “Would you like a glass of water,” I say, aghast, as my favourite actor in the world begins, properly, to sob.

Well, not exclusively sob, because – in between deep intakes of breath – he is speaking, or trying to speak. “You know… I’m sorry. Actually, I am not sorry! I’m not sorry because it’s part of the job really. This is – aaaagh,” he groans. “This is actually… very interesting.” He smiles in that brave way people do just before they’re about to start crying again. “I’m going to pour you a glass of water,” I say, idiotically. He is an actor, I remind myself, as he stares up at the ceiling to keep in the tears. Is he acting now?

“Aaaaaagh,” moans Vincent Cassel. “Wooooooh. Feels really good, actually.” And then, after a pause, “Would you like some water, too?” He pours me a glass. “You didn’t expect that one, ah?” he chuckles. “Non!” he exclaims. “You have to understand something. I don’t care really. I don’t care. This is what I do. I play with these kinds of things. So you can kill somebody in a movie and then you can cry about things in your childhood. Which is fine. But, yes. The reason I am emotional about this – whoooh [the sound of a gigantic exhalation] – is because…” His voice is travelling up the octaves now at dangerous pace, then cracks: “It’s true.”

 

May 9, 2013 4:15 pm  #40


Re: Crying on cue: stories behind the scene

another part of the portrait about vincent cassel, where he sobs...

I had always assumed, because he’s never talked about it before, that he’d become a boarder in his teens. But he says flatly, he started, “much younger”. How old was he? “Seven”, he says – and the tears begin to flow. There follows the scene described above; more tears, then some talk about the merits of therapy: he spent some time in psychoanalysis but never wanted to cure himself “because I’m using it [in his acting]. The day I’m cured, what am I going to do?” He concludes that his tears “will give you a different insight into everything I said before but it’s – how can I say that... Yeah – we talked about anger, we talked about running away to different countries, we talked about not trusting anything. The thing is you never really cure yourself of your childhood.”

 

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